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is up 105. >>> coming up, serious side effects of losing sleep. dr. kim explains how a lack of sleep can alter your genetic makeup. >> and a healthy diet breakthrough but the study is halted. why experts say they couldn't ethically keep going. >> hi, i'm meteorologist lawrence karnow in the kpix 5 weather center. almost feeling like spring outside today but could we soon see some rain? we'll talk about that coming up. in today's health watch... there's new evidence showing how the chemical b-p-a can harm children's health. b-p-a is used to make plastic >>> in today's healthwatch, there's new evidence showing how the chemical bpa can harm children's health. bpa is used to make plastic containers. a study at duke medical school found it may disrupt the gene that's critical to the development of the brain. the findings raise new questions about whether bpa contributes to developmental disorders including a certain type of autism. >>> a starting wake-up call about sleep deprivation. sleeping fewer than six hours a night, even for as little as a week, c
is the first pope to abdicate in 600 years. how much he could collect during "retirement." >> dr. kim has the new way to determine what a baby means when he cries. >> and lawmakers in one state seeing red. >>> i'm meteorologist lawrence karnow in the kpix 5 weather center. storm clouds heading south lots of sunshine now and boy temperatures really warming up. we'll talk about that coming up. [ female announcer ] this is a special message from at&t. [ male announcer ] it's no secret that the price of things just keeps going up. [ female announcer ] but we have some good news. it's our bundle price promise. [ male announcer ] a price you can definitely count on for two whole years. from at&t. call to get u-verse tv starting at just $19 a month with our triple-play bundle. get the same great price for two years. plus now two times the internet speed than before. [ female announcer ] switch today and get a total home dvr included for life. [ male announcer ] you get reliable high-speed internet on our advanced digital network. choose from speeds up to 24
ahead, dr. kim hammond from falls road animal hospital is here to answer your pet questions. if you have a question, e-mail petquestions@wbaltv.com, or visit our site, wbaltv.com. >> we are one day closer to a big budget deadline in washington. i am hallie jackson with more on what automatic spending cuts could mean for you and people you know. >> washington has just eight days to avoid huge spending cuts. officials are trying to take steps to avoid the worst-case scenario. hallie jackson has more on what impact the cuts will have beyond the beltway. >> is looking to become the new f-word, furlough. >> 800,000 civilians working for the defense department may be cursing the news out of the pentagon. they will be forced to take one day off each week of massing spending cuts take place on march 1. >> i will pay the mortgage and utilities, and then you live on what is left. >> the furloughs would begin in mid-april and last more than five months. the pentagon would need to find billions more in savings if no deal is reached. >> this is felt in big and small towns alike, and it won't be just
. dr. kim with the new fat facts that may change everything. >> most of the state of arizona has had more rainfall than the bay area over the past five weeks. what's going on? i'll explain as another sunny day we have outside right now, but rain is coming. find out when it's going to arrive coming up. >> and game changer. the iron is getting the boot. monopoly fans have voted in a new token. the changes coming to the board game. >>> nearly vehicles were mangled on a georgia interstate following a fiery pile-up this morning am a petroleum tanker truck and at least six vehicles caught fire. three people were killed. and several others were hurt. the wrecks happened on the major artery between savannah and macon. >>> a deadly crash killed two members of the san francisco 49ers family hours after they had takenned the super bowl. authorities say tight end delanie walker's aunt and uncle were killed on interstate 10 outside of new orleans. police say a 26-year-old driver was drunk when she slammed into the youngs' car. both cars caught fire. apparentl
on it. >>> coming up, get out of your exercise rut and keep your if you years resolution. dr. kim with the blitz workout that will shake things up. >> and flammable furniture. the new rules on what goes into your couches that will change how you furnish your home. s. >> and a live look at the eastern span of the new bay bridge. we're counting down to opening day. kpix 5 is the official television station for the new bay bridge opening celebration. new year's resolutions. doctor kim checked out a new way to keep you focused -- with the >>> around this time of year people get stuck in a rut and ditch their new year's resolutions. dr. kim checked out a new way to keep you focused with the blitz workout. >>> reporter: running, biking, swimming, even the best of us can hit a plateau. that's a lot of shaking. when a workout no longer works. if that's the case -- >> more sweat, more talk, let's go. >> reporter: try doing the blitz. >> something a little more athletic and more, you know, kind of i guess in your face. >> arm circles get it going. >>
created a 49ers doughnut that's dusted with edible gold. let's ask dr. kim if that's good for you. and not to be left out, bay area ravens fans can opt to buy a raven road kill doughnut filled with raspberry jelly. >>> the 49ers need to do more than score big on sunday. they need to score a good night's sleep. but that might not be so easy as dr. kim reports. >> reporter: the 49ers better watch out. hoards of fans are heading to new orleans and on saturday night, those backing baltimore could be up to no good. prank calls even worse in the middle of the night. [ ring ] >> dr. kim, it happens. a soccer team in sweden once had fans outside a hotel room who actually had a megaphone, fireworks and were using their car horns to wake up the players. >> reporter: but it's not just fan shenanigans. pre-game jitters can kick off a serious bout of insomnia but no worries, these guys got a plan. >> the best sleep is like two days before the game. that's where it counts. that's where you should get the most rest. >> reporter: even so -- >> it's difficult
what's wrong? dr. kim says, don't do it! w trying to self >>> well you feel sick so what do you do? maybe google your symptoms to figure out what's wrong? dr. kim says, don't do it. why trying to self-diagnose can backfire on you. >> can find out a gazillion things wrong with you if you wanted to. >> aneurysms, cancer, all that stuff. i feel like i'm a doctor sometimes. >> reporter: from the common cold to the rarest most exotic diseases the internet is filled with information about every possible ailment. for a growing number of people all that information may pose a greater health danger than what might actually ail them. >> it's like hypochondria triggered by the internet. >> reporter: it's called cyber- chondria when people self diagnose and stress out. >> my left arm was numb and sore. the first thing that showed up i'm having a heart attack. >> the fear kind of just keeps the getting escalated. >> reporter: by the time people see a doctor, based on what they have read online they think the worst. >> that's the risk which is there by using
's easier to stay in bed or on the couch than go to the gym. >> dr. kim checked out a new way to keep you focused with the blitz workout. >> running, biking, swimming. even the best of us can hit a plateau. >> that's a lot of shaking. >> when a workout no longer works. if that's the case. >> more sweat,less talk. >> try doing the blitz. >> a little more athletic. something a little more in your face. >> arm circles, get it going. >> the director of blitz at sports club l.a. in san francisco. >> let it rest on the shoulder. >> blitz is a tougher circuit training. the group is small. every exercise scaled to an individual's fitness. >> incoming classes i have are athletic people working out with some deconditioned people as well. >> on this day, she gave blitz a try. >> switch hands. >> as for a workout, she got one. >> i was sweating with the boys, which was nice. it definitely was a different class than i'm used to and less than half an hour, it was way more. >> at the end of the class, you feel good because you worked hard and you suffered with people. >> you suffered wit
with autism. >> kpix 5 dr. kim tells us women may be able to reduce the risk of having an autistic child by taking a certain supplement. >> autism is a disorder where early in life, a child's brain doesn't develop normally. now, a new study finds how folic acid may cut the risk of autism nearly in half. the reduction was seen in women who use it had b vitamin before or early on in their pregnancy. the problem more than half of all pregnancies are unmrauned. i spoke to a number of young women and it became clear when it comes to how much folic acid they take. >> i don't know. >> i'm not sure how much i get. >> don't know what that is. >> no. >> i actually don't. i don't take any. >> folic acid occurs naturally in some foods including green leafy vegetables like spin ach beef liver asparagus. the fda required refined products be fortified primarily to reduce the risk of neural birth defects. while there's no guarantee taking the b viet mine will prevent autism, mom to be caroline thinks it's more good news about a vitamin she already take sgls i started taking it about six months before i
. in tonight's healthwatch, dr. kim has the five ways to fight the common cold and stay healthy. [ female announcer ] safeway presents real big deals of the week. or how to get great prices on things you need. we know you look around for the best deals. that's why we give you real big club card deals each week. right now best foods mayonnaise is just $2.77. so pile it on. pizza is served. digiorno pizza is just $3.88. and here's a treat. dreyer's ice cream is only $2.88. real big deals this week and every week. only at safeway. ingredients for life. death at a home in sebastopol. this is on ross station road ... not far from the "iron horse vineyards." chopper 5 is live overhead . >>> dating breaking news in sonoma county, three people found shot to death in sebastopol near the iron horse vineyards. a relative found the bodies after returning home this afternoon. right now, they say there's no official word on whether it was a murder-suicide. but investigators say they are not looking for a shooter. we'll bring more details to you as we get the information.
out of your diet every day. dr. kim reports on just how easy that can be. >> reporter: arna has high blood pressure so tries to keep salt out of his diet but it's not easy. >> when i go to the supermarket i look at the package and the sodium. if it's high i don't buy it. >> reporter: packaged and restaurant foods are to blame for almost 80% of the salt in our diets. most people consume a teaspoon of salt a day. that's more than double the amount recommended. new research from uc-san francisco shows as many as half a million lives could be saved if americans reduce salt by 5% a year for 10 years. >> lowering sodium is really the goal that you want to have to lower blood pressure and then prevent strokes, renal disease, heart attacks. >> reporter: so here are five ways to reduce salt. first, do it yourself. stay away from prepared or processed foods. number 2, stick to fresh or frozen vegetables. these are zero salt. three, if you are buying canned veggies, get no salt added. or rinse under water. rinses removes 41% of salt from canned vegetab
be the cure for heartburn. dr. kim has the attractive alternative to popping pills in tonight's healthwatch. [ crickets chirping ] [ traffic passing ] ♪ [ music box: lullaby ] [ man on tv, indistinct ] ♪ [ lullaby continues ] [ baby coos ] [ man announcing ] millions are still exposed to the dangers... of secondhand smoke... and some of them can't do anything about it. ♪ [ continues ] [ gasping ] >>> a highly contagious blood infection has a 17-year-old boy hospitalized in the north bay. kpix 5 reporter anne makovec with the health warning sent out to students at petaluma high. >>> reporter: >> it's very scary for all of us for parents for students, that really appears this is an isolated case. >> reporter: a case of a highly contagious blood infection caused by pay bacteria that can also cause meningitis. a student at petaluma high school, 17-year-old christopher pozzi-swain, started feeling sick on saturday and collapsed from exhaustion. he has been in the hospital ever since. >> i cried for quite a long time because he's one of my very, very
tripled over the past thirty years. dr. kim - on what >>> we are seeing more and more younger women diagnosed with deadly breast cancer. a new report shows the number has tripled over the past 30 years. what might be fueling the trend, dr. kim reports. >> this is the chest muscle. >> reporter: researchers pored over data at the national cancer institute and made a startling discovery. since the 1970s, the number of young women diagnosed with deadly breast cancer is slowly but steadily going up. >> this terrible metastasized late stage breast cancer is increasing in young women. >> reporter: the number rose from roughly 250 cases in 1976 to 850 cases 30-year later. >> this gives us huge process what's going on in young women to cause aggressive breast cancers. >> reporter: while the study doesn't say what's driving the trend -- >> it is mind-boggling. >> reporter: -- this breast cancer specialist has an idea. >> i think we're living in a big chemical soup. >> reporter: goodson says the cancers in the report are fueled by hormones but don't blame
dr. kim will look at an alarming increase of risk to one of the last groups of people you would expect. >> plus, he started the first ten games for the 9ers before being benched. where alex smith is going. >> i'm meteorologist lawrence karnow in the kpix 5 weather center. a strange week with temperatures in the 70s and maybe rain too. we'll talk about that coming up. (sir can-a-lot) good day, ma' lady. [muffled] i am sir can-a-lot. i am sir can-a-lot here to save you from another breakfast bore. wake up those eggs with glorious spam! (woman) hmmm... that's actually a good idea. [nervous giggle] (male announcer) break the monotony. for more fun ideas visit spam.com. kansas city.. smith lost his starting job to colin kaepernick in november.. oncussion >>> a number of major sports outlets say 9ers quarterback alex smith has been traded to kansas city. he lost his starting job to colin kaepernick in november after sustaining a concussion during the game. kaepernick went on to lead the 49ers to the nfc championship and a close loss to baltimore in the
and damaging role in the cause of a serious chronic disease. dr. kim - with >>> sugar is not sweet. bay area researchers say they have evidence that sugar place a unique damaging role in the cause of a serious chronic disease. dr. kim with the bittersweet findings. >> reporter: 13-month-old kiran is on a picnic with his parents. on the menu, fresh fruit. his mom says it's a challenge keeping him away from sugary treats. >> well, one thing is what i would like to give him and another thing what he eats. [ laughter ] >> reporter: now a new study shows how the sugar that is so irresistible to kiran may be fueling a global explosion in diabetes. >> it's actually downright detrimental. >> reporter: researchers studied 175 worldwide countries focusing on what people ate and the rates of diabetes. they found calories from sugar damage the body. >> what this study shows categorically is that a calorie is not a calorie. >> reporter: extra calories may pack on weight but the study found the more calories that came from sugar, the more diabetes. for every 150
are being diagnosed with autism. >> kpix5's dr. kim tells us women may be able to reduce the risk of having an autistic child by taking a supplement. >> autism is a disorder where early in life, a child's brain doesn't develop normally. a new study finds how folic acid may cut the risk of autism in half. the reduction was seen in women who used the b vitamin before or early on in pregnancy. i spoke to a number of young women and it became clear when it comes to how much folic acid they take. >> i don't know. >> i'm not sure how much i get. >> don't know what that is? >> no. i don't think any. >> folic acid occurs naturally in some foods, like spinage, beef liver, asparagus, and brussel sprouts. primarily to reduce the risk of birth defects. and while there's no guarantee taking the vitamin will prevent autism, mom-to-be thinks it's more good news about a vitamin she already takes. >> i started taking it six months before i got pregnant. >> yes. excellent. >> women of child baring age need 400 grams 00 -- micrograms. >> we're going to need 400 inches of rain if this sunshine keeps
, depression, headaches and suddenly everything goes haywire. dr. kim says before long, the women seem possessed like their brain is on fire. >> reporter: young women dazed restrained in hospital beds acting possessed and then becoming catatonic. they have been so normal when suddenly their lives went haywire. >> one minute i would be sobbing crying hysterically and the next minute i would be laughing. >> i was paranoid, manic. there was something wrong. >> reporter: it got worse for emily a college sophomore hospitalized and out of it she couldn't control her arm movements. then there were seizures and she needed a ventilator. >> it was life and death for weeks. >> we were losing her to something that i couldn't control. >> reporter: doctors also couldn't figure out what was wrong with susannah. >> i was normal and the next minute, i'm, you know, hallucinating and, you know, suggesting that my father kidnapped me. >> reporter: it turns out they weren't mentally ill. they had a rare auto-immune disorder where the body attacks the brain causing
-assisted treatment advocate, fresh start, square one, holyoke, massachusetts. dr. kim sumner-mayer, senior advisor, phoenix house center on addiction and the family new york, new york. fran, what is the definition of family within our society currently? that's a very good question. family has changed, the definition. we used to think of family as two parents living in a house with two children and probably a pet or two. now, we have a wide variety of families. we have families that are one parent, single parent, being raised by friends, being raised by grandparents, relatives of all sorts. the good thing about that is it brings the ability of a lot of diversity, a lot of ethnic cultures are different, and i think that across america we have a lot better chance to have families describe themselves in the way that is most comfortable for them. and, nancy, it goes even beyond that. it goes into same sex parenting. it goes into a whole host of other issues, correct? yeah, and i think what's important is, as fran just said, you know, it's how the individual defines for themselves who is their family. y
symptoms, try to figure out what exactly is going on what's wrong with you. dr. kim says don't that. why trying to self diagnose can backfire. >> you can find a ga zillion things wrong with you if you wanted to. aneurysms, cancer, all that stuff. i feel like i'm a doctor sometimes. >> from the common cold to the rarest and most exotic diseases, the internet is filled with information about every possible ailment. for a growing number of people all that information may pose a greater danger to their health than what might actually ail them. >> it's like hypokond ra, which is triggered by the internet. >> it's called cyber chondria. it's when people spend hour after hour online reading self-diagnosing and stressing out. >> my left arm was getting like, quite numb sometimes and sore. i looked that up, and the first thing that shows up, i'm having a heart attack. >> fear cannot just kiep getting escalated, escalated. how are you feeling today. >> by the time people see a neurologist based on what they've read online, they think the worst. >> that's the risk, which is there by using all these
and spanish researchers say they broke the code. dr. kim mulvihill with the details. >>> reporter: when it comes to understanding a crying baby, most parents are clueless. >> no. i wish. [ laughter ] [ screaming baby ] >> reporter: when a baby cries -- >> it means anything. is she hungry? feeling sick? is she afraid of somebody? let's just go down the list and find out exactly what the baby is trying to communicate. >> reporter: now spanish researchers have cracked the baby code. >> they could decode it and tell me why, if i had a reference sheet every time she cried that would be great. >> reporter: listen to the eyes and lists end to the sound. an angry baby keeps his eyes half closed looking in apparently no direction with an open mouth. his cry goes up and up and up. a scared baby keeps his eyes open all the time and moves his head backwards. a scared cry begins with tension, then explodes. and a baby in pain, his eyes are constantly closed and he is frowning. the cry starts suddenly at maximum intensity. in the study, the researchers found
's healthwatch, dr. kim has the five ways to fight the common cold and stay healthy. that story and more coming up at 5:00. >>> all right. time to eat now. tony's table today an old family recipe that's perfect for a nice winter day. >> reporter: well, today's's tony's table with steph we'll do a dish with my mother made all the time. you say it better than i do. >> you need to work on your accent. [ non-english language ] >> we just add some carrots and chicken sauce with water. so it is not so much of a strong flavor. some bay leaves and rosemary. let's bowl this. let's enjoy this. it's cold and i want to eat this right now. >> it's so -- everything in there is so soft. >> look at that. beautiful. >> and the celery cut them good sized pieces know the too small because they will get nice and soft. perfect. one more scoop. we got two spoons? now we are going to finish this off with a little bit of cheese on top. and just a little bit of extra virgin olive oil and we'll put rosemary in there. >> now it's nice and pretty ready to serve. >> grandma
's resolutions. dr. kim has an answer to keeping those exercise resolutions. how the blitz workout can shake up your routine and keep you on track. that is coming up at 5:00. >>> the grammys are days away. they will be given out right here on cbs sunday night at 8:00. >>> today we have an inside look at one of the bands up for album of the year. >> taylor and i have revealed the nominees in one more grammy category. album of the year. >> some nights by fun. >> it's a dramatic theatrical big pop rock band. >> each song is such a huge anthem and they go for broke on every song and they have this huge chorus and they have this fist pump moment. >> sometimes you find a band that they might speak to one genre but somehow, some of the music that they make just seems to creep into all the other genres. >> i think they are a long time -- particularly with younger bands. i think post-nirvana there has been a desire not to be big in the first place and not to sort of make the big statement. ♪ [ music ]♪ ♪ carry on ♪ the ♪ >> sounds like i don't know a li
at protecting older americans. dr. kim on what you need to know. >>> reporter: with the blue skies and warm weather, i just had to ask. gorgeous day here around the bay. are you worried at all about the flu? >> uhm, a person that's not worried. >> reporter: any concerns about getting the flu? >> no. >> i don't worry at all about it. >> reporter: heat to rain on your sunny day but the flu is still here. the predominant strain is nasty, statewide 36 individuals under 65 have died, six in the bay area. >> this h3n2 strain that we have now causes really serious disease. >> reporter: more bad news. this year's vaccine is not doing a good job in protecting older americans. while it's 56% effective for most of us, for those over 65 it's only 27% effective. and only the% 9% effective. elderly have week weaker immune response. >> seniors are also affecting the worst and respond the least well to the vaccine. >> reporter: the vaccine is still recommended especially for those under 65. >> that also prevents a lot of influenza and prevented them from giving th
as a week can change your dna. dr. kim mulvihill with the eye opening report. >>> reporter: too little sleep can really change a person. >> tired, grouchy. >> cranky. >> it's hard to focus. >> reporter: well, a new report reveals that change may be more profound than you think. >> i'm becoming my evil twin. >> reporter: in a british study, 26 volunteers slept fewer than six hours a night for just a week. subsequent blood tests redeveloped a startling change to their dna. this short-term sleep loss disrupted the activity of more than 700 of their genes. genes critical to stress, inflammation, metabolism, your biological clock, even how we fight disease. >> it just demonstrates the need for sleep. >> reporter: this doctor is medical director at the stanford sleep medicine center. he says these new findings are a real wake-up call. >> it just underscores the importance for the need for a good amount of sleep during the night to try and set a regular bedtime, regularric whatting time and to maximize the amount of sleep you have during the night. >> rep
coverage is coming up next. >> dr. kim is here to answer your pet questions. >> the inner harbor was once again the side of a huge super bowl rally yesterday with a national audience. >> on this purple friday, raven's fans can an early to show that they are true blue. >> it is cold but the fund. >> hundreds of fans packed the inner harbor at the deer 48 wbal/today show rally started with our broadcast at 5:00 a.m. and continued through the "today show." all morning, our ava marie showed what it takes to be ribbons fanlike how to do the dance. >> i think i got it down. it is pretty basic but it is all about the motion. >> morales was in town based on my bed with l. roper. l. roper agreed to dress up as the ravens mascot if the baltimore ravens win. >> i cannot wait until monday. >> if the 49ers win, morales agreed to dress up. >> it started even by 4:00 and fans are showing up ready to show the entire country that ravens spirit is alive and well in baltimore. >> is impressive especially because of the snow. i did not think anybody would show up. >> it takes more than a little snow to keep
to answer your pet questions, dr. kim hammond. >> this is handsome. and this is a handsome cat. he actually the like a dog. he will actually doing dhue things. handsome, give me a kiss. >> no. >> [laughter] is he a little overweight or is this just a large cat? >> well, john, come on. in', we're -- we have a row turnedaness here. >> but he is a large cat. >> cats can handle a little bit of extra weight believe it or not. it's not a bad thing, you know? it's not something that's going to be -- provided they don't have secondary heart disease. this is actually a healthy weight. >> you can tell he is very excited. >> absolutely. or scared out of his wits. i took our kidens now there's a lump since the incision site and she doesn't appear to be in discomfort. is this normal? >> yes. t reaction the suchers have underneath the skin and they are healing and forming a scar which should disappear in about six weeks. >> my three -- dogs, that's part of their behavior. it's genetic. >> they smell something? >> yes and dig for a lot of reasons. cats sometimes in the summertime, they are looking for coo
is wrong and dr. kim said not to do that. self-diagnosing can back fire. >> and i can can find a gazillion things wrong with you. >> the cancer and that stuff. i feel like i'm a doctor sometimes. >> reporter: from the common cold and the rarest and most exotic diseases, the internet is filld with information about every possible ailment. >> and for a growing number of people, that information may pose a greater danger to their health than who might ail them. >> and that is look hypokindia triggered by the internet. >> reporter: it's called cyberchondri, when people spend time self-diagnosing. >> my arm was sore and numb and i looked that up. the first thing is i am having a heart attack. >> and that fear is escalated. >> reporter: they think the worst. >> and that is the risk, there by using all of the random searches. >> reporter: 28-year-old lisa luck can not stop. and with each symptom she reads about, there is another behind it and more on that and goes on and on. >> i am hoping to find a sense of relief. the exact opposite thing happens. i am stressing myself. do i have this? do i hav
the faces of the singers and movie stars of korea. >> reporter: k-pop says dr. kim has helped fuel that desire. it's a well-known fact in the k-pop world. >> translator: it's not uncommon, says the president of cj entertainment. >> reporter: k-pop is visual. looks are important. so one thing i will say, after spending most of the day here, is that things have come a long way. when i grew up, it was definitely not cool to be korean. but things have certainly changed. a world only getting smaller, merging, on the big stage, a personal one. >> thank you all for listening. i'm eli alexander. >> reporter: cnn, irvine, california. >> i love that. so when you hear the word olympics you think, what, pole vaulting, sprinting, long jump. but what they're calling the olympics in india. a main event, getting run over by a tracker. we'll explain. this day calls you. to fight chronic osteoarthritis pain. to fight chronic low back pain. to take action. to take the next step. today, you will know you did something for your pain. cymbalta can help. cymbalta is a pain reliever fda-approved to manage
. impossible, can't be done, and forget about it. dr. jim kim is a professor at harvard medical school and one of the cofounders of partners in health. >> and here we are, you know, not even a decade later, where the goal is to treat every single human on the planet who needs hiv treatment with the right drugs. >> and look at this man, stricken with tuberculosis. they saved his life and thousands like him. farmer and kim figured out not just a new way to treat multidrug-resistant tb, but a cheaper way to provide the medicine. their breakthrough has become the new standard and has saved the lives of people around the world. you were able to lower drug prices. how is that possible? >> i realized very quickly, but these are all old, generic drugs. there's no reason for them to be so expensive. so we did some very simple things. we talked to drug procurement specialists who had contacts in india who said, "we can make these drugs for on hundredth of the price." >> but drugs only work if people take them. so partners in health came up with the idea of hiring community health workers, fellow village
to our next speaker. our next speaker is doctor allison dymnicki. dr. kim the key is a researcher at the american institute for research. our work focuses on understanding how school and community environment and fosters students social and competencies and prevents engagement in risky behavior. thank you very much. let's bring her on. [applause] >> good morning. i had the pleasure of being the last presentation before lunch some going to probably are growling stomachs but i will try to get dressed assess again and i'm delighted to be here today. the title of my talk is the impact of social and emotional learning. i want to start twice thanking several colleagues, a number of whom are here today, including eric gordon, pamela bennett, who are collaboratively working with me on a large study of implement social, emotional learning districtwide in a school districts as well as several other colleagues from castle and the american institute of research and work with me on both of these studies. i want to start by defining what social and emotional learning is. we heard a lot about th
there could be more victims of dr. nikita levy who have yet to be identified. kim dacey has more details. >> good morning. baltimore city police say they have a lot of evidence to go through. he treated hundreds of patients there could be more victims out there. baltimore county monday morning the doctor was found dead. they confirmed nikita levy took his own life. at the time of his suicide, he was being investigated for allegations that he photographed and videotaped his patients during appointments. in a statement, an employee first notified the hospital on february 4 and within a day it was determined that levy had been illegally photographing his patients and possibly others with his personal video and photographic equipment and storing those images electronically. the doctor acknowledged the allegations and was fired on february 8, 10 days before police discovered his body. his friends and neighbors declined to comment about the doctor's death and the investigation. levy had no known disciplinary actions in the last 10 years. he graduated from cornell university in 1984. he recei
. >> there allegations he took inappropriate pictures and video of his patients. kim dacey has more. >> police say dr. nikita levy treated hundreds of patients at johns hopkins hospital but there could be more out there. police were called to his home on monday morning and found the doctor dead inside. they confirmed nikita levy took his own life. he was being investigated for allegations that he photographed and videotaped his patience during appointments. in a statement, an employee first floated the hospital on february 4 and within a day it was determined that levy had been illegally photographic patients and possibly others with his personal equipment and storing those images electronically. the doctor acknowledged the allegations and was fired on and8, 10 days before police discovered his body. levy had no known disciplinary actions in the last 10 years. he received his maryland license in 1988. officials notified a few of levy's patients about the allegations. a call center has been set up for possible victims. reporting live, kim dacey, wbal- tv 11 news. >> anthony batts 1 named a new directo
happens tonight at 11:00. plus details from johnny's dr octor. donna hamilton, wbal-tv 11 news. >> interesting. the mayor will give her state of the city address. kim dacey has a preview. >> thank you. the 10-year fiscal outlook was released last week. ruin by 2022 unless budget cuts are made. in 10 years, it will be more than $2 billion in the hole. a local economist points out the city cannot tax its way out without losing more residents and businesses. the tax rates are already the highest in the state. cuts will have to be made. the mayor will announce her ideas. the state of the city is this afternoon. she has given a few hints, including making modern investments and changing the tax infrastructure to make baltimore more competitive for growth. the state of the city is at city hall at 2:30 this afternoon. reporting live in the newsroom, kim dacey, wbal-tv 11 news. >> now weather and traffic together on the 1's. >> good morning. sarah caldwell checking on your morning commute. the roads are wet. we are seeing delays on the north side. 21 miles on the west side. this is a l
every pptient whose privacy - payyhave been violated..-violated.dr. levv's beeavior violates johns hopkins code of ccoduct and prvacy policies & ann issagainst everything for phhch johns hopkins edicine ssands."- kim hoppe, johns hopkins medicine sppkesperrsn &psppkeepersonwe have hopkins' ffll statement n & foxbaltimore.ccm-sllsh nnwslliks.paau gessler, fox45 news at tenn.--3& 3 a former maintenance worker at 3 convicted of sexxally abuuing -&ptwo girls and filming tte 3 his life in prison. &pprison.the crime happened here... at lake shore christian acaaemy in pasadena. 62- year- old "paul loreez the third" was a long-time maintenance workkrrthere.in sepetmber... he pled guiity to charges f sexual aause, producing child pornographyy and possessing it.authorities -3 were tipped off when a girl &pstarted busing her about six yyarr ago... when he lived in &pa camping trailer on school property. 3 drivers... &pare... getttng... more gaa pains tonite.. toniie..gas... 74... a gallon toddy./..up... 11 cents... from this... tt
center. getting a lot of reaction after dr.'s decision to test.t its third nuclear president obama calling it a provocative act. nato pose a governing body also calling this irresponsible. the nuclear test is north since kim jong un took power. this could take no career a step of building agoal nuclear warhead small enough to on a long-range missile that could threaten the u.s. a u.n. security council expected an emergency meeting on all this later this morning. brianne carter, abc 7 news. >> president obama is putting finishing touches on his address.the union he will go before a joint of congress and the country at 9:00 tonight. >> the president expected to lay out his priorities for second term. control,lude gun- immigration reform, and clean energy. the white house says he will also outline a plan to create that will grow the middle class. the florida senator marco rubio deliver the gop response. kentucky senator rand paul will give the tea party response. outspoken critic of obama will attend tonight's state of the union address. musician and an advocate ted guest ofll be the
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